Apple-backed study says data breaches in US surge 20% in first nine months of 2023

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Stuart E. Madnick, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, carried out the study approximately a year after the iPhone manufacturer introduced Advanced Data Protection for iCloud, a new feature that extends end-to-end encryption for data stored in its iCloud service. AFP

Stuart E. Madnick, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, carried out the study approximately a year after the iPhone manufacturer introduced Advanced Data Protection for iCloud, a new feature that extends end-to-end encryption for data stored in its iCloud service. AFPAccording to a 2023 survey, over 80% of breaches involved data stored in the cloud, making the target for cybercriminals very clear, Apple said in a report citing the study.

Apple-backed study says

Stuart E. Madnick, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, carried out the study approximately a year after the iPhone manufacturer introduced Advanced Data Protection for iCloud, a new feature that extends end-to-end encryption for data stored in its iCloud service.

Additionally, Apple stated: “The overall number of data breaches has worsened in 2023 and more than tripled between 2013 and 2022, exposing 2.6 billion personal records in the last two years alone.”According to the study, hackers regularly target technology companies because they offer services to valuable targets.Chinese hackers attacked Microsoft earlier this year, taking thousands of emails from the US State Department with them.

According to a report on the company’s website, Craig Federighi, senior vice president of software engineering at Apple, stated, “Bad actors continue to pour enormous amounts of time and resources into finding more creative and effective ways to steal consumer data, and we won’t rest in our efforts to stop them.”Federighi continued, “We’ll keep finding ways to fight back on behalf of our users by adding even more powerful protections as threats to consumer data grow.”

98% of organizations, according to the study, have a relationship with at least one technology vendor who has had a data breach within the previous two years. Almost all organizations in the connected world of today rely on a variety of software providers and vendors. Because of this, hackers can access the data stored by any organization that depends on a vendor by simply taking advantage of flaws in third-party software or that vendor’s system, according to the study.End-to-end data encryption is made to make it hard for anyone else or the organization storing the data to decrypt a user’s data.

Apple-backed study says

Shortly after announcing its third round of layoffs for 2023, the music streaming service Spotify announced that its chief financial officer would be leaving next year. Spotify CEO Daniel Ek said that the company had “come to the conclusion that Spotify is entering a new phase and needs a CFO with a different mix of experiences” in a statement announcing CFO Paul Vogel’s departure.This week, Spotify announced that it would be laying off 17% of its global workforce, citing the need to reduce expenses and turn a profit. The Associated Press (AP) was informed by a spokesperson that about 1,500 people would lose their jobs.

The announcement of the layoffs earlier this week caused a roughly 8% increase in Spotify’s stock price. Securities filings show that Vogel made a move on Tuesday to sell shares valued at over $9.3 million. Over $1.6 million in shares were also cashed in by two other senior executives, as reported by the Guardian.Vogel is departing from Spotify on March 31st. As Spotify looks for an external replacement, Ben Kung, who is currently vice president of financial planning and analysis, “will take on expanded responsibilities” in the interim, the company announced in a blog post.

Stockholm-based For the nine months ended in September, Spotify reported a net loss of 462 million euros, or roughly $500 million. The business declared in January that it would be laying off 6% of its entire workforce. It laid off another 2% of its workforce, or roughly 200 people, in June, mostly in its podcast division.In the third quarter, Spotify reported better-than-expected user and subscriber growth along with a surprise profit. According to a Wall Street Journal report, the company increased the cost of its subscription in the US and other major markets over the summer. The long-awaited increase, according to the company, has not resulted in higher churn


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